Welcome to my practice. I am a licensed psychologist, specializing in anxiety, addiction, and eating disorders, while also treating a broad range of problematic issues such as depression, low self-esteem, trauma, self-injurious behaviors, and relationship distress.

 

LEARN MORE

Why Therapy

One of the questions I commonly encounter in my work with clients is, “how is talking about my problems going to fix anything?”  This is such an unfortunate misperception, as brain science now provides scientific evidence to support what was once just experienced by those in therapy, that is, the relationship matters and heals!  A meaningful therapeutic connection accomplishes this through a concept called neuroplasticity, which is the brains’ ability to reorganize itself and form new connections in response to new learning and experience.  A therapeutic relationship that encompasses attributes such as attunement and resonance helps cultivate the development of integrative fibers in the brain that promote self-regulation, meaning that you can handle life’s ups and downs with more balance.  This process also reduces cortisol, the stress hormone, as well as other inflammatory markers in the body, which have been associated with depression and anxiety.  In addition, talk therapy helps to integrate and process feelings and experiences that are unresolved and likely causing one distress.

If you are considering therapy, are suffering, or are not satisfied with your life, important questions to ask yourself include “do you find yourself held back in life by your depression, anxiety, addiction, eating disorder, low self-esteem, etc?  Are you waiting until you’re ‘better’ to begin certain goals, be more social, be a more loving partner/mother/friend, or start that exercise program you know would be good for you?  Are you confused by behaviors that you keep engaging in that you are not good for you, but you can’t seem to stop?   Have you been able to give up an unhealthy coping mechanism, only to have it replaced by another unhealthy one?”

If the answer is “yes”, to any of the above then starting therapy is absolutely the first step in the right direction.

BLOG

Recent Posts

Self-Compassion is the New Self-Esteem

The research is in! Those who score higher in self-compassion have less anxiety and depression and bounce back easier from setbacks. The self-esteem movement of the 90's has shown some cracks. Namely, we have taught people that in order to feel good about themselves,...

The Negativity Bias

My day started off great! I woke up on time (without my alarm), my mood was light, I had my favorite espresso, kids were off to their respective places, the first few client sessions were meaningful, and then one negative hiccup..... Sure enough, before I knew it, my...

Casualties of Perfectionism

The almost casualty of my perfectionism today was delighting in my 2-year olds newfound coloring skills and the fact that I had finally found a “play” activity that I enjoyed as much as my child.  The latter of which has been no small feat and believe me I have tried...

The Myth of Multitasking

Me singing: "Mary had a little lamb, little lamb..." Internal thought process: "Geez, how many verses does this song have?" "I'm supposed to be working right now! You're supposed to be sleeping!" I feel myself getting frustrated and irritable. I had big plans for nap...

Emotions and Feelings

People often use the terms "emotions" and "feelings" interchangeably, but it can be helpful to understand the difference between them, as this aids in learning how to regulate ourselves when experiencing an emotional tsunami.  Antonio D’Amasio, a professor of...

How you choose to focus your attention matters!

One of the most empowering messages to come out of neuroscience is that our very thoughts and and where we place attention changes the physical structure of the brain (Donald Altman, MA, LPC).  More importantly, the significance of self-directed neuroplasticity...

Lifespan of an Emotion

"I recently read in the book My Stroke of Insight by brain scientist Jill Bolte Taylor that the natural life span of an emotion—the average time it takes for it to move through the nervous system and body—is only a minute and a half. After that we need thoughts to...

Alcoholism and Addiction

A significant percentage of my practice is comprised of individuals struggling with alcoholism and addiction.  For most of these individuals, shame and guilt are pervasive, chronic, and destructive.  Many individuals struggling with alcoholism and addiction are blamed...

Why do we need fat in our diets?

Fat, often erroneously, is mistaken as the “enemy” and many try to avoid eating it at all costs.  We all need fat in our diets, however, it should comprise no more than 25-30% of our daily caloric intake. FAT IS NECESSARY FOR: Normal growth and development Energy (fat...

Don’t Eliminate Carbohydrates

DON’T ELIMINATE CARBOHYDRATES! Carbohydrates have become almost as evil, in some people’s minds, as fat, making it “in vogue” to eliminate them from one’s diet.  This is unfortunate, as this  macronutrient should comprise approximately 45-65% of our daily caloric...

INSTAGRAM

@DrAdinaMcGarr