Emotions and Feelings

Emotions and Feelings

People often use the terms “emotions” and “feelings” interchangeably, but it can be helpful to understand the difference between them, as this aids in learning how to regulate ourselves when experiencing an emotional tsunami.  Antonio D’Amasio, a professor of neuroscience and author of several books on the subject, explains it as:

Feelings are mental experiences of body states, which arise as the brain interprets emotions, themselves physical states arising from the body’s responses to external stimuli. (The order of such events is: I am threatened, experience fear, and feel horror.)

In other words, an emotion is a physiological experience (or state of awareness) that gives us information about the world, and our feelings are our conscious awareness of the emotion itself.  Our feelings then are mental portrayals of what is going on in our bodies when we have an emotion.  Feelings are the byproduct of our brains perceiving and assigning meaning to the emotion.  Feelings are the next thing that happens after having an emotion, involve cognitive input, usually subconscious, and cannot be measured precisely.

So, it is important for us to remember that individual emotions are temporary, but the feelings they evoke may persist and grow.  This happens because the feelings triggered by emotions are not isolated to that particular emotional stimulus, as they are influenced by thoughts, memories, and images that have become subconsciously linked with that particular emotion for you.

Keep in mind, that it works the other way around as well.  Feelings can be triggered by emotions and colored by thoughts,  but simply thinking about something threatening can also trigger an emotional fear response.  Unfortunately, this can set in motion a cycle of painful and confusing emotions which produce negative feelings, which cause more negative emotions.

 

Lifespan of an Emotion

Lifespan of an Emotion

“I recently read in the book My Stroke of Insight by brain scientist Jill Bolte Taylor that the natural life span of an emotion—the average time it takes for it to move through the nervous system and body—is only a minute and a half. After that we need thoughts to keep the emotion rolling. So if we wonder why we lock into painful emotional states like anxiety, depression, or rage, we need look no further than our own endless stream of inner dialogue.” ~ True Refuge – Tara Brach

How to heal from pain?

How to heal from pain?

“The way to heal pain, the only way, is to feel and release it.  Your pain is your pain. Your fear, desperation, and resentments are yours, too.  All these emotions belong to you.  Feel them, learn from them, and let them go” (Melody Beattie, Journey to the Heart, 1996).

Sugar Addiction – A Deadly Habit

Sugar Addiction – A Deadly Habit

Why is Sugar so Addictive?

Why is Sugar so Addictive?

It seems so simple and unthreatening, doesn’t it? A spoonful of sugar on your morning breakfast cereal, a candy bar for an afternoon pick-me-up, or a soda for a little extra energy…they all seem harmless enough. But, when looked at as part of a total diet that includes processed sugar, natural sugar, and hidden sugar in foods we eat, many people are surprised to learn that they have a sugar addiction. As a Santa Barbara therapist I work with many patients who are trying to free themselves from the control sugar has over their lives.

In a landmark report that focused attention on our national sweet tooth, the U.S. Department of Agriculture stated that the consumption of sugar calories hit a record high in 1999 – an astonishing 155 pounds per year! The food industry practice of using high-fructose corn syrup as a sweeter has resulted in sugar showing up in some of the most unlikely places such as hot dogs, pizza, boxed rice, soups, spaghetti sauce, lunch meat, flavored yogurts, ketchup, and mayonnaise. It can be difficult to control sugar intake, even for people who maintain a healthy diet. For people who have difficulty managing anxiety it can be downright impossible.

As a Santa Barbara psychologist, I often witness first-hand the connection between sugar addiction and mental health problems. The relationship between food and mental health becomes so intertwined that patients sometimes depend on food and sugar to help them get through the day. While a medical doctor can help manage the physical aspects of withdrawing from a sugar addiction, I provide counseling to help patients work through the mental and emotional reasons behind their sugar addiction.

Understanding Sugar Addiction

Research has shown that there is a fundamental connection between sugar and brain cells. While sugar does supply the fuel your brain needs to function, your brain can also come to see sugar as a reward.  Continued overuse of sugar results in the brain demanding more and more sugar. The feeling can be similar to the effects of drugs or alcohol, which provide an artificial “high.”

The “rush” we get from our mid-day sweet snack can be attributed to sugar. This turns into glucose in our bodies, and spikes our blood sugar levels. Unfortunately, blood sugar levels then drop quickly, which can leave you feeling lethargic and ultimately make you crave even more sugar. When combined with a stressful job situation, unhappy marriage, or traumatic life events, the sugar high can become an addictive way of making ourselves feel happy.

Some people don’t realize that highly refined, starchy, carbs,” can have the same effect. Things like pretzels, white bread, pasta, potatoes, and crackers raise and lower blood sugar levels quickly.

 

Signs of Sugar Addiction

It may be hard to realize that you have a sugar addiction. Think about your daily food habits and your relationship with food. Here are some questions that might help determine whether sugar is starting to exert an unhealthy influence in your life:

  • Does it feel like you are always “craving” something sweet?
  • Do you often think about eating sweets?
  • Do you lose control when eating sweet foods?
  • Is it difficult for you to say “no” to sweet foods?
  • When you try to cut back on sugar, do you feel intense cravings?
  • Do you experience mood swings that go up and down quickly after eating sugar?
  • Have you even eaten more than you planned, or more than you know is needed, because of a sweet taste?
  • Have you ever felt guilty or ashamed about the amount of sugar you have eaten?
  • Do you turn to sweet foods to help you deal with emotions such as depression, sadness, anger, or loneliness?
  • How often do you use sugar as a reward for yourself?
  • Do you associate sweet foods with any specific positive memories or emotions?

These questions don’t necessarily indicate that you have or don’t have a sugar addiction, but they can be helpful guidelines. If you think there is cause for concern it is always best to check with a medical doctor to rule out an  underlying medical condition and to consult a psychologist.

Overcoming a Sugar Addiction 

Dr. Adina McGarr-Knabke
 

 

 

 

Why is Sugar So Addictive?

 

 

 

Emotions

Emotions

Emotions drive thoughts far more than the other way around (this has to do with the greater number of connections from the limbic center to the pre-frontal cortex).

Emotion

Emotion

Emotions cannot be permanent.  That’s why they are called “emotions”–the word comes from “motion,” movement.  They move; hence, they are “emotions”.  From one to another you continually change.

-Osho

Intense emotions have been likened to an ocean wave.   They crash over you and may knock you off your feet,  however, just like a wave, they always recede.  Learning to ride these waves of emotion without “acting out” is a necessary life skill.

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