When Eating Becomes a Problem

 

Insatiable Hunger and Binge Eating Disorder

An eating disorder might seem humorous. Have you ever joked that you could “eat everything on this table?” For some people, though, overeating is no laughing matter. Overeating and binge eating disorders are complex illnesses that can be life-threatening. As a Santa Barbara psychologist, I have seen how they can completely overwhelm patients’ lives and wreak havoc on their bodies.

Although both issues are generally labeled as eating disorders, there are some differences between insatiable hunger and binge eating disorder. With insatiable hunger, patients feel like they are always hungry, no matter how recently or how much food they have eaten. Although there may be some type of physical cause for this feeling, it can also stem from anxiety. It could be based on feelings of low self-esteem, or might represent insatiable needs which were not met by parents or significant others. Therapy for anxiety can often uncover these underlying causes and alleviate the feeling of continual hunger.

According to The Something Fishy Website on Eating Disorders, a binge eating disorder usually involves periodic occasions where sufferers will go on an eating binge and consume a large quantity of food in a short period of time. They feel like they have no control over their actions. Sufferers continue taking in food until they are uncomfortably full, and do not take any voluntary steps to purge the food from their bodies. Binge eating may be used as a means of hiding from emotions, filling a void inside, or coping with stresses and problems. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), it can manifest with a sense of depression about the overall situation and loss of control. Depression counseling may be one step in understanding why these patients feel so sad that they look to unhealthy eating habits for comfort.

In either case, long-term afflictions with the disorder can lead to serious health issues. The patient will likely be overweight and may suffer from high blood pressure, diabetes, and other diseases associated with overeating. For these sufferers, it is not as simple as going on a diet or working with a nutritionist to learn about healthy eating habits. They may need to see a psychologist for depression in order to work through their feelings of despair and to understand the unhealthy role food is playing in their lives.

Understanding Insatiable Hunger and Binge Eating Disorder

 

Insatiable Hunger and Binge Eating Disorder

It can be difficult to accept the fact that you no longer have a healthy relationship with food. You may try to forget any episodes of unhealthy eating, and may attempt to hide any evidence. You may push away others who try to show concern or offer help. The first step in overcoming any type of disorder is realizing that you are acting in a way that is not healthy for your mind or your body. Some questions which might help determine if you or someone you love are dealing with insatiable hunger or a binge eating disorder include:

  • Do you recognize when you are full and are you capable of stopping eating?
  • Do you feel like you are always hungry, even after a physician has ruled out any possible medical causes?
  • Do you often eat more in comparison to others at the same meal?
  • Do you try to hide your eating, or evidence of how much you have eaten?
  • What are your eating habits like now compared to what they were a year or two ago?
  • How much food do you eat in a typical day?
  • Have your sleep patterns been interrupted by your eating habits?
  • How quickly do you eat?
  • How do you feel emotionally about the way you eat?
  • Have your eating habits affected your relationships with others?
  • To what extent is your life controlled by your eating?
  • Do you have secret “stashes” of food in various locations?

Your answers to these questions don’t necessarily indicate that you have an eating disorder, but they provide helpful guidelines. If you think there is cause for concern, it is always best to check with a medical doctor and a Santa Barbara therapist to confirm your suspicions. 

Overcoming an Insatiable Hunger or Binge Eating Disorder

The first thing to understand if you think you are dealing with an eating disorder is that you are not alone. There are many people in situations similar to yours, many people who can help you, and many people that love you. When you come to me for help with managing anxiety and/or your eating disorder I spend time getting to know you so we can explore the emotional roots of your condition together.

Dr. Adina-McGarr-Knabke, Santa Barbara TherapistIn addition to psychotherapy, I may recommend a consultation with your medical doctor to discuss antidepressants or other medication to help you deal with the emotional turmoil you are experiencing. It may also be helpful to seek alternative therapies to relieve stress and tension. The Deep Tissue Massage Center specializes in Therapeutic Deep Tissue Massage which promotes full body stress relief, healthy function of muscle tissues, and speeds recovery. Points of Health Acupuncture helps you rejuvenate, relax, balance, and heal. Together we’ll help you regain control of your life.

If you feel you are being controlled by insatiable hunger or a binge eating disorder, contact my office immediately to set up a session, and let me help you find a path to a better life.

Dr. Adina McGarr-Knabke
The Santa Barbara Therapist

 

About MySantaBarbaraTherapy.com: If you feel you need therapy for depression to help you overcome an insatiable hunger or binge eating disorder, consider setting an appointment with Dr. Adina McGarr-Knabke, the Santa Barbara Therapist. The doctor provides counseling for anxiety to help patients deal with many types of eating disorders. The office, which is located at 1187 Coast Village Rd., Suite 10P in Santa Barbara, also provides alcoholism and addiction treatment services. Visit the website at https://www.mysantabarbaratherapy.com to find links for more information regarding binge eating. “Like” the Facebook page to receive updates, tips, and information on managing anxiety and sustaining good mental health. Appointments to see the psychologist for anxiety and other mental issues may be made online or by calling 818-518-6775.

 

Insatiable Hunger and Binge Eating Disorder

 

 

 

Welcome to my practice! I am a licensed psychologist, specializing in anxiety, addiction, and eating disorders, while also treating a broad range of problematic issues such as depression, low self-esteem, trauma, self-injurious behaviors, and relationship distress.